Earthquakes of 4.0 or larger in Oregon and Washington dropped by 50% in the last decade, compared to the the three decades from 1969 to 1999. Earthquakes of 3.0 or larger in Oklahoma dropped 78% from 2015 to 2018

(This article was originally published 6/6/2019)

"I wonder if this is a contrivance of the Enemy,’ said Boromir. ‘They say in my land that he can govern the storms in the Mountains of Shadow that stand upon the borders of Mordor. He has strange powers and many allies.’

‘His arm has grown long indeed,’ said Gimli, ‘if he can draw snow down from the North to trouble us here three hundred leagues away.’

‘His arm has grown long,’ said Gandalf.

From " The Fellowship of the Ring ", by J.R.R. Tolkien, 1954

This is a big one. Blows against the Empire!

It’s June 2019, and great, epochal positive changes are underway at every level of our reality.

Those changes include exponential decreases in lightning strikes, as well as seismic and tornado activity.

As you’ll see in one of the articles that I’ve appended below, Oregon and Washington experienced 16 4.0 magnitude or larger quakes per decade from 1969 to 1999. From 1999 to 2009, the number was 11. From 2009 to 2019 it was 8.

The generational Satanist author of the article carefully hedged by omitting the much-more-impactful percentages of the drops, so I had to do the math. Strong seismicity in Oregon and Washington dropped 31% from 1999 through 2009, compared to the previous three decades from 1969 to 1999. And, in the last ten years, it dropped another 27% compared to the ten preceding that. We note that the rate of the drop is steady, with a slight decrease going forward in time (from 31% to 27%).

Drawing back - over the last ten years, quakes of 4.0 or larger in Oregon and Washington dropped by 50% - dropped by half - compared to the three decades from 1969 to 1999.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma recorded a record-high 903 3.0 magnitude or larger earthquakes in 2015. Then the number dropped 31% to 623 in 2016, then dropped 51% to 201 in 2017, and dropped 2.4% to 196 in 2018. There, we see the positive change increasing, going forward in time from 2015 to 2017.

Summing up, in Oklahoma, earthquakes of 3.0 or larger dropped 78% from 2015 to 2018.

I’ve just documented recent, dramatically-decreasing seismic activity across two widely-dispersed geographies.

If you couple that data with 2018 having the lowest number of lightning deaths in history, and that lightning deaths dropped 30% from 2013 to 2017, and 2018 had the lowest tornado deaths in history, and that 2018 was the first year with no violent tornadoes in the United States since the modern records began in 1950…it paints quite a picture.

Well, geez, what’s going on? Let’s go to the Illuminist talking-head shill quoted in the mainstream news article from the Pacific Northwest:

“Malone did not have a neat explanation for what the cause for a region-wide earthquake lull might be.”

The largest event in the past decade was also smaller than the largest event in any previous decade, ” wrote Malone in the journal Seismological Research Letters. “It seems inescapable that strong seismicity has taken a break .”

Or how about the Illuminist talking-head shill quoted in the mainstream news article from a third geography, Kansas:

“Langenbruch said injection limits put into place by state regulators have made a difference. His model predicts that at current injection rates, the number of widely felt earthquakes in Kansas and Oklahoma will decrease to as few as 100 by 2020. That’s down from the thousands of earthquakes felt in the area at its peak in 2015.”

Can you see how the earthquakes peaked in Kansas in 2015, just like they did in Oklahoma? Can you see how he suggests that the great positive change is being driven by a local, government-implemented reason, and ignores the wider trend that includes Oklahoma and the Pacific Northwest? That’s a propaganda technique called " compartmentalization ."

Their headline, “New Research Predicts Fewer Earthquakes In Kansas”, makes it seem like saw it coming before anyone. When in fact they’re writing a hit-piece to cover up the larger trend I’m elucidating here.

We can’t know the exact percentage of the drop because hey’ve used the general terms " down " and " thousands " to cloud the picture. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

They never imagined they’re run into a guy like me. Or, their bosses even told them they would, only it didn’t matter, because they’ve got nothing to fight me with but the same old tired, bullshit tactics.

You can run with their personal truths, or go with mine: that the slow, steady, widespread and ever-increasing distribution of Orgonite devices drawing down and transforming the level of Death energy in the wider environment, and that is leading to exponential decreases in seismic, lightning and tornadic activity.

Wilhelm Reich called that energy “Dead Orgone Radiation”.

It just struck me - science has been so corrupt for so long that the field is wide open for discoveries such as these.

It takes studious, ongoing effort to cover up the truth, while the truth wants to be revealed, in fact reveals itself.

It truly is a great time to be alive.

If you’d like to be added to the mailing list, or know someone who would be, please send me a note at [email protected]

January 2 2018 - Lightning deaths at all-time record low in 2017

Lightning killed 16 people in 2017, the fewest deaths since accurate records began in 1940, the National Weather Service said. This broke the previous record low of 23, set in 2013, weather service meteorologist John Jensenius said.

(Omits the percentage, 30%, replacing it with the terse, general “broke” - ed)

October 4, 2018 - 2018 US tornadoes lowest in 65 years of record-keeping

December 26, 2018 - 2018 will be t he first year with no violent tornadoes in the United States

While we still have several days to go in 2018, and some severe weather is likely across the South to close it out, odds favor the country making it the rest of the way without a violent tornado.

If and when that happens, it will be the first time since the modern record began in 1950.

2005 came close to reaching this mark. That year, the first violent tornado didn’t occur until Nov. 15, much later than typical for the first of the year, which tends to come in early spring.

In simple terms, there have been downtrends in violent tornado numbers both across the entire modern period, and when looking at just the period since Doppler radar was fully implemented across the country in the mid-1990s. A 15-year average as high as 13.7 in the mid-1970s will drop to 5.9 next year.

Expanding to include all “intense” tornadoes, or those F/EF3+, this year’s 12 is also poised to set a record for the fewest. I wrote about this back in May, and 2018 has kept pace for record lows since then.

December 28, 2018 - Tornadoes set record lows in 2018 with only 10 deaths in US

December 30, 2018 - Oklahoma earthquakes decline for third year, but state primed to shake another decade

As December comes to an end, Oklahoma recorded 196 earthquakes of at least magnitude 3.0 this year. The peak was 903 in 2015, followed by drops to 623 in 2016 and 302 in 2017. Oklahoma had six quakes in 2018 that were at least 4.0, which was one more than in 2017 but well off the record of 27 in 2015.

February 15, 2019 - The Pacific Northwest Had Fewer Quakes This Last Decade

Former Pacific Northwest Seismic Network director Steve Malone analyzed the number of earthquakes over the past five decades in Washington state and Oregon. He noticed an unmistakable drop in quakes greater than magnitude 4 in the most recent decade — 2009 to present — compared to all the prior ones.

“The largest event in the past decade was also smaller than the largest event in any previous decade,” wrote Malone in the journal Seismological Research Letters. “It seems inescapable that strong seismicity has taken a break.”

Oregon and Washington together experienced 15 to 17 earthquakes with magnitudes above 4.0 per decade between 1969-1999. The next decade, 1999-2009, the number of bigger quakes dropped to 11 and then during the most recent decade it tailed off to eight. Malone re-ran his analysis using the much larger catalog of all quakes above magnitude 2 and noted that the abundance of low-level temblors hewed closer to a consistent level.

Malone did not have a neat explanation for what the cause for a region-wide earthquake lull might be. But seismologists are coming around to accepting there are non-random cycles of earthquakes, said Harold Tobin, the current director of the Northwest seismometer network based at the University of Washington.

“The essential question is, does that mean we’re in a quiet period now and what was before that was normal?” Tobin said in an interview Friday. “Or have we returned to normal after a decade or so of an unusually large numbers of earthquakes?”

Tobin said the length of time for which good records exist is not long enough, geologically speaking, to determine what is normal.

Malone’s analysis was published online Wednesday under the catchy title, “An Ominous Quiet in the Pacific Northwest.”

April 26, 2019 - New Research Predicts Fewer Earthquakes In Kansas

Langenbruch said injection limits put into place by state regulators have made a difference. His model predicts that at current injection rates, the number of widely felt earthquakes in Kansas and Oklahoma will decrease to as few as 100 by 2020. That’s down from the thousands of earthquakes felt in the area at its peak in 2015.

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