Paddlefish in Oklahoma are half again as large as they were thirty years ago. Their growth rate is increasing exponentially, and the time between records is decreasing exponentially, going forward in time

“Crime causes so much horror, even to them [criminals], that they would like, in order to escape from the necessity they feel to be bad, to be believed and always to be depicted as virtuous.”

― From " Justines, or The Misfortunes of Virtue ", by the Marquis Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, 1791

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(Angler James Lukehart of Edmond holds the potential world-record American paddlefish that he snagged June 28, 2020, at Keystone Lake. This 146.7-pound monster bested the month-old state record held by Jeremiah Mefford, who is also in this photo and was serving as Lukehart’s fishing guide.)

It’s July 2020, and great positive changes are underway at every level of our reality. Those changes began in earnest in 2012, and have been increasing in speed and magnitude. I’ve been writing daily articles on the subject since 2013.

These epochal positive changes are being driven by the collective influence of untold thousands of inexpensive Orgonite devices based on Wilhelm Reich’s work.

Since Don Croft first fabricated tactical Orgonite in 2000, its widespread, ongoing and ever-increasing distribution has been collectively unknitting and transforming the ancient Death energy matrix built and expanded by our dark masters, well, all the way back to Babylon and before. And, as a result, the Ether is returning to its natural state of health and vitality.

One of these changes is fish growing larger than they ever have in history.

For example, a current news story that I’ve appended below is headlined " Biologists recognize pre-historic fish record"

Where the author has omitted the name of the fish, the word “state”, the word “world”, and the name of the state, all to make the subject virtually unsearchable.

Did I mention it’s a pending world record?

The author’s name is Mike Newell. Since we’ve already caught him at gamesmanship, we know that Mike is a spy, an agent, a flatfoot, a confidence man, a generational Satanist stooge.

You can’t identify them by their appearance. You can only identify them by their codified propaganda language, and the more-than-occasional secret hand sign.

The Oklahoma state record and pending world record paddlefish, from June 2020, weighed 146.7 pounds, and was 2.6% larger than the previous 143-pound Oklahoma state record holder from just a month previously, in May 2020.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, and such records are not broken often, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size. Here the record stood for just a month, and was broken by a sizable margin.

The article on the May record reads “Guide finally gets to fish, smashes paddlefish record”

Where, under the false guise of familiarity, the author has omitted the name of the state, along with the word “state”, to make the subject drastically less searchable.

In the article, the author “buried” the previous record holder fifteen paragraphs down, in the very last paragraph:

“The previous Oklahoma record was the catch of a 132-pound, 8-ounce paddlefish in 2018 on the Arkansas River.”

Can you see how the author obfuscated the name of the person who caught it? That’s an example of a propaganda technique called “compartmentalization”.

The Oklahoma state record and pending world record paddlefish, from June 2020, weighed 146.7 pounds, and was 2.6% larger than the previous 143-pound Oklahoma state record holder from a month previously, in May 2020.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, and such records are not broken often, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size. Here the record stood for just a month, and was broken by a sizeable margin.

That record holder from May 2020 was 8% larger than the previous record from 2018, which weighed 132.5 pounds.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, and such records are not broken often, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size. Here the record stood for just two years, and was broken by a gigantic margin.

The Oklahoma state record paddlefish from June 2020 weighed 146.7 pounds, and was 11% larger than a previous 132.5-pound record holder from 2018.

That’s an average annual increase in size of 5.5% over those two years.

The current Oklahoma state record paddlefish, from June 2020, weighed 146.7 pounds, and was 31% larger than a previous 112-pound record holder from 1992. That’s a baseline average annual increase in size of .81% over those 38 years.

The growth rate from 2018 to 2020 is closing in on seven times that seen from 1992 to 2020, yet it is the last entry in the data set. The growth rate is increasing exponentially, going forward in time . That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The Oklahoma state record Paddlefish from 2018 weighed 132.5 pounds, and was 5.6% larger than a previous 125-pound, 7-ounce record holder from 2011. That’s an average annual increase in size of .8% over those seven years. That’s smack on the baseline.

The record holder from 2011 was 3.9% larger than the previous 121-pound record holder from 2003. That’s an average annual rate of increase of .48% over those eight years.

That record holder from 2003 was 11.9% larger than the previous 112-pound record holder from 1992. That’s an average annual rate of growth of 1% over those eleven years. That’s 20% above the baseline.

There were two 100-pound prior record holders from prior to 1992. Those dates, and all other records prior to 1992 have been scrubbed from the web.

The current Oklahoma state record and pending world record paddlefish, from June 2020, weighed 146.7 pounds, and was 47% larger than two previous 100-pound record holders from prior to 1992.

Paddlefish in Oklahoma are half again as large as they were thirty years ago.

Annual size increase, Oklahoma State Record Paddlefish:

Pre-1992 to 1992: 100 lbs. to 112 lbs. - 12% increase

1992 to 2003: 112 lbs. to 121 lbs. - 8% increase over 11 years. 1% increase in size per year

2003 to 2011: 121 lbs. to 125.7 lbs. - 3.8% increase over eight years. .46% increase in size per year.

2011 to 2018: 127.5 lbs. to 132.5 lbs. - 3.9% increase over seven years. .55% increase in size per year.

2018 to 2020: 132.5 lbs. to 146.7 lbs. - 11% increase over two years. 5.5% increase in size per year.

The increase from 1992 to 2003 is the first data in the set, and yet it is 20% above the baseline. That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible.

The average annual growth rate from 2003 to 2011 is roughly half that seen from 2003 to 2011. As we would expect, given that organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The average annual growth rate from 2011 to 2018 is 20% higher than that seen from 2003 to 2011. The growth rate is increasing exponentially, going forward in time. That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible , as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The average annual growth rate from 2018 to 2020 is the highest in the data set, and it’s the last data in the set. That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible.

The average annual growth rate from 2018 to 2020 is ten times that seen from 2011 to 2018. The growth rate is increasing exponentially, going forward in time. That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible , as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The time between records is 11 years, 8 years, 7 years, 2 years, 1 month. The time between records is decreasing.

That’s the opposite of what is supposed to be occurring , as such records are not broken often, and organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

There’s clearly been some great positive change in the environment of the paddlefish in Oklahoma.

That unmentioned positive change is Etheric, energetic. The Orgonite-driven improvement of the Etheric environment in Oklahoma has caused paddlefish there to grow larger than any previously seen anywhere, in all history.

There’s an international news blackout in place on the subject. Because you’re not supposed to know that the primary driver of the size and longevity of any organism is the health of its Etheric environment.

Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, July 13, 2020

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June 1, 2020 - Guide finally gets to fish, smashes paddlefish record

Mefford kept the fish in a live well while he waited for the biologists to arrive. It weighed 146 pounds on his boat scale, but the official weight, on a certified digital scale, was 143 pounds.

The previous Oklahoma record was the catch of a 132-pound, 8-ounce paddlefish in 2018 on the Arkansas River.

July 5, 2020 - Biologists recognize pre-historic fish record

By Mike Newell Correspondent

Although some conspiracy theorists might disagree, the dinosaurs are gone, extinct!

Sorry Nessie, of Loch Ness fame. Oklahoma, however, is home to several species of fish that are older than dinosaurs, and one particular species has been in the news lately for giants of its kind being caught.

The world record for paddlefish taken with rod and reel will likely fall to a giant 146.7-pound Oklahoma monster snagged at Keystone Lake on June 28 by James Lukehart of Edmond.

The massive fish was confirmed as the official new state record for that species, beating the previous record of 143 pounds set just over a month ago by Jeremiah Mefford of Kiefer, who was on hand to see his state record fall by the wayside.

Mefford is a fishing guide, and Lukehart was his client when he snagged the huge paddlefish. Mefford provided a witness signature on the record fish affidavit.

The standing rod-and-reel world-record American paddlefish, taken from a Kansas pond in 2004, is listed at 144 pounds. The largest American paddlefish on record, taken by a spearfisherman in Iowa in 1916, reportedly weighed 198 pounds.

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