Roughly one in five smart phone users will become addicted and have serious behavioral problems

“The great enemy of clear language is insincerity. When there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish spurting out ink.”

From " Politics and the English Language ", by George Orwell, 1946

The incidence of schizophrenia is 100% higher in cities than it is in rural areas.

The incidence of mental disorder or insanity is 82% higher in areas near the center of the city, vs. the residential sections near the outskirts.

The incidence of psychosis is 77% higher in urban areas than in rural areas.

The depression rate is 40% higher in cities than it is in rural areas.

The rate of cognitive decline is 32% faster in cities than in rural areas.

The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease is 6-19% higher in cities than it is in rural areas.

The Center for Urban Design and Mental Health’s website tells us that “Cities are associated with higher rates of most mental health problems compared to rural areas: an almost 40% higher risk of depression, over 20% more anxiety, and double the risk of schizophrenia.”

Where they’ve violated a basic journalistic rule to spin the dialogue, to trick the reader. Percentages are to be listed in order, highest to lowest, as I have in the list at the top of this article. Here, the author properly put the 20% increase in anxiety after the 40% increase in depression. But they’ve blatantly “buried” the 100% increase in schizophrenia to the last.

And you notice how they changed “100% increase” to " double the risk"?

The literally-blood-drinking agents who write this stuff for a living call it " tradecraft ".

While they’ve chopped it up to do what they can to obfuscate, it’s clear that there’s something highly negative in the urban environment.

This information is from a “What To Think” article that propagandists call a “hit piece”. Since they know that the subconscious of many or most readers will grasp virtually any straw to remain off the hook of personal responsibility, they’ve listed three bullshit plausible-deniability excuses to cover the fact that the increased density of Death energy in the urban environment has a very real and tangible effect on the health of the organisms living in that environment. And that includes mental health.

The author avers that schizophrenia is twice as high in urban areas as it is in rural ones because of “Pre-existing risk factors, Social factors, and Environmental factors.”

If you strip away the endless jabbering, and just use those three headings, as I have, you can see how it’s just a set of plausible-deniability excuses, all of them general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

The long, earnest list of “social factors”, which is delivered with the firmness of purpose that goes with complete honesty, is exposed as Orwell’s “cuttlefish squirting out ink”.

From a scientific perspective, we’ll focus for the moment on Environmental factors.

The author says that “The urban setting can affect people in two key ways: increasing stimuli , and stripping away of protective factors .”

The everything-but-the-kitchen-sink jibbering and jabbering continues: “they may have diminished access to nature , fewer opportunities to integrate exercise as part of their daily routines, and reduced leisure time as increased time is spent at work and commuting around the city. People may find themselves feeling unsafe, having less privacy, and even less sleep , due to factors like crowding, light, noise and stress.”

Diminished access to nature, less exercise, reduced liesure time, less privacy and less sleep. That’s the extent of the physical drivers. There is no mention even of increased toxins and pollutants in the urban environment as possible drivers of mental troubles.

Their version: “Diminished access to nature, less exercise, reduced leisure time, less privacy and less sleep doubles schizophrenia in cities versus rural areas”.

My version: “Mental health improves and degrades with that of the Ether.”

Higher levels of Death energy in the urban environment cause to the populace there to go bad in the head.

An article below from 2016 from Scientific American reads: " ‘being in the city does something to a specific circuit in the brain that impairs your ability to deal with social stress,’ says Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, director of University of Heidelberg’s Central Institute for Mental Health in Germany."

“Does something to a specific circuit in the brain.” Can you see how it’s general ? Andreas has used his position as an authority figure to put forward a bullshit thesis based upon nothing.

Herr Meyer-Lindenberg, a couple of quick questions: one, what is a “brain circuit”? Two, what specific circuit in the brain are you referring to? And , as a followup: what, specifically, does living in a city do to that specific circuit in the brain, beyond, as you stated, " something "?

Remember, this is a supposed, so-called Scientist , talking about Science . He’s the Director of the Mental Health Institute for a major University.

It’s how the few control the many.

Here’s Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg’s picture:

image

I’ve included it so you could get a better idea of what a generational Satanist in a position of moderate influence looks like.

As the Director of the Mental Health Institute for a major University, he’s getting up toward the top of the “Mental Health” control pyramid.

You can’t identify them by their appearance. You can only identify them by their codified propaganda language, along with the occasional secret hand sign.

They’re in every city, town and village on Earth, hiding in plain sight, masquerading as “the most respectable citizens”. And they typically are, with the exception of their serial lying, along with the barely-closeted human sacrifice and cannibalism that they’ve been practicing as a tribe, well, all the way back to Babylon, and before.

The words " mystery ", " baffled " and " puzzled " are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why a Chinese study from 2017 that I’ve appended below reads “To date, little is known about factors associated with problematic or addictive smartphone usage.”

Another study below, from 2014, is entitled “The Relationship between Mental Health and Addiction to Mobile Phones among University Students of Shahrekord, Iran”.

In it, the author states that “with increased and improved mental health, the rates of students’ addiction to mobile phones reduced.”

Can you see how they’ve gymnastically, Satanically inverted it? Their thesis: " as people became saner, they decided more often to put down their phones ."

Versus the truth, that increased phone use drives a worsening of mental health. They’re Death energy delivery vehicles. They deliver what Wilhelm Reich called “Dead Orgone Radiation” directly into your skull.

The lead author on that study - the one who just gymnastically inverted it to take the blame away from the phones - is Zahra Babadi-Akashe, MSc.

Here’s her picture:

image

I’ve included it so you could get a better idea of what a generational Satanist in a position of marginal influence looks like.

You can’t identify them by their appearance. You can only identify them by their codified propaganda language, along with the occasional secret hand sign.

They’re in every city, town and village on Earth, hiding in plain sight, masquerading as “the most respectable citizens”. And they typically are, with the exception of their serial lying, along with the barely-closeted human sacrifice and cannibalism that they’ve been practicing as a tribe, well, all the way back to Babylon, and before.

Zahra’s study continues: “The findings of Shambare et al. showed that mobile phone use was mostly addictive, habitual, and dependent.14 The study of Ahmed et al. showed that a small number , less than 18.50%, of Pakistani students displayed mobile-related addictive behaviors.”

18.5% is roughly one in five. If I handed you a revolver, spun the cylinder, told you that one of the six chambers had a bullet in it, and asked you to put it to your temple and pull the trigger, we’d be playing a game called “Russian Roulette”. If I told you that there was only a small chance of your being harmed as I handed you the pistol, I don’t think you would feel good about me, and I don’t think you would agree.

Zahra’s a stooge, a spook, a shill, a bad actor, an asset, a flatfoot, a spy.

But I thank her for doing the legwork and letting me know that roughly one in five phone users become hopelessly addicted. Her study continues:

“Hooper ýand Zhou, psychologists from Staffordshire University, studied 106 people who had used ýmobile phones, and found that 16.00% of them have behavioral problems.”

The 18.5% of those addicted to their phones and the 16% of those who have behavioral problems is almost identical, almost one-to-one.

If there were a black box warning for phones that said “roughly one in five users of this device will become addicted and have serious behavioral problems”, would that do anything for you?

A Chinese study from 2017 showed 30% of smart phone users were addicted.

Now there are two shells in the six chambers of the revolver.

And the black box warning must be amended to say “Roughly a third of users will become hopelessly addicted to this device.”

To maintain current programming levels, stop reading immediately, breathe through your mouth and affirm “Zahra said only a small number displayed mobile-related addictive behaviors.”

We’re going to get up and past all of these issues as a species, and I believe that’s taking place right now.

As you can see from this article.

Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, July 20, 2020

If you’d like to be added to this free mailing list, please send me a note at [email protected]

2014 - The Relationship between Mental Health and Addiction to Mobile Phones among University Students of Shahrekord, Iran

Hooper ýand Zhou, psychologists from Staffordshire University, studied 106 people who had used ýmobile phones, and found that 16.00% of them have behavioral problems. Their research concluded that behavioral problems followed by the addiction to cell phone use causes stress.12 Despite the importance of mobile phones in everyday life, research indicated that some people use this device uncontrollably and this has affected their personal lives.13 Review of research literature on the subject indicated that excessive use of mobile phones is a form of technology addiction. Results of the study by Hooper and Zhou showed that the rate of mobile phone use among university students is very high.12 There is a relatively high number of evidence for mandatory, voluntary, or dependent use of cell ýphones; however, habitual, compulsive, and addictive behaviors of mobile phone use are relatively ýless observed.

The findings of Shambare et al. showed that mobile phone use was mostly addictive, habitual, and dependent.14 The study of Ahmed et al. showed that a small number, less than 18.50%, of Pakistani students displayed mobile-related addictive behaviors. In this study the targeted subjects used mobile phones under reasonable conditions, and thus, did not have the tendency for addictive behaviors in mobile phone use.15 The results of several studies showed that addiction to text messages has a relationship with students’ social anxiety and nervousness, and personality traits of extraversion and neuroticism. Furthermore, the rate of addiction to text messages in different educational groups of students were different.1,11,16

Moreover, other studies showed a positive correlation between depression and anxiety and the amount of sent text messages in a day, and loss of control and social anxiety.17,18 Chen examined the relationship between depression and mobile phone addiction on 519 American students and concluded that there was a significant association between mobile phone addiction symptoms (distraction, withdrawal, and escape) and depression. In addition, he stated that women had significantly higher rates of mobile phone addiction symptoms compared to men.19

Technology addiction in general and dependency on cell phones in particular are important for several reasons. Despite the advantages and necessity of technologies for human society, due to their stimulating factors, they results in excessive use and lead to addiction. Young people are more vulnerable to excessive phone use, and thus, become phone dependent.20 Young people’s mental health, addiction to mobile phones, as a driving force, and an active community is major topics that are discussed in psychology and sociology. The present study addressed the question of whether there is any relationship between the amount and type of cell phone addiction and mental health status of university students in Shahrekord, Iran.

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Methods

Due to the purpose of this study, this research was an applied research survey. The study population consisted of all students in different universities of Shahrekord (Islamic Azad University, Payame Noor University, and University of Medical Sciences). From among the target population, 296 subjects were randomly selected. Two types of questionnaires were used to collect data that include the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) questionnaire, and 32-point scale questionnaire of behavior associated with mobile phone use (Hooper and Zhou, 2007).12 The SCL-90-R questionnaire has been used in many researches in Iran and outside Iran, and has a high reliability.12,21-23 The validity and reliability of the mobile phone use questionnaire in some researches was at a high level.13,19 In order to analyze the collected data, SPSS for Windows (version 18, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) was used. The Pearson correlation analysis, Student’s independent t-test, and chi-square test were used for data analysis. From the total of 296 students who participated in the study, 57.10% were men, 49.90% were female, 14.90% were single, 85.10% were married, 34.80% were living in a dormitory, and 65.20% lived elsewhere. Moreover, 50.30% studied in public Universities of Medical Sciences, 32.80% studied in Payame Noor University, and 16.90% enrolled in Islamic Azad University.

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Results

Based on the results of table 1, the majority of students, according to the categories of addictive behaviors of mobile phone, were placed in the three categories of habitual behaviors (21.49%), voluntary behaviors (21.49%), and dependent behaviors (21.49%). Based on the results of table 2, students, with regard to mental health, had higher rates of depression (17.30%), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (14.20%), and interpersonal sensitivity (13.80%). Results showed that with confidence interval of 0.99 and P < 0.001, there was a relationship between mental health and four out of six categories of mobile phone addiction (habitual behaviors, dependent behaviors, addictive behaviors, and involuntary behaviors). In fact, only at the level of voluntary and compulsive behaviors there was no significant relationship with students’ mental health. The results showed that with confidence interval of 0.99 and P < 0.001, there was a significant negative relationship between mental health and general behavior of addiction to mobile phones. This means that as the rate of mobile addiction becomes less, the students’ mental health increases. Table 3 presented phone addictive behaviors that have a significant relationship with mental health. Based on these results, mental health of university students of Shahrekord did not differ according to demographic factors (gender, type of university, type of residence, education, and marital status).

Table 1

Ranking mobile phone addiction in terms of defined behaviors (n = 296)

Description Percentage

Habitual behavior 21.49

Voluntary behavior 21.49

Dependent behavior 21.49

Involuntary behavior 16.53

Compulsive behavior 16.53

Addictive behavior 15.70

Table 2

Ranking mental health in terms of study dimensions

Description Percentage

Depression 17.30

OCD 14.20

Interpersonal sensitivity 13.80

Anxiety 11.60

Psychosis 10.88

Hypochondrias 10.46

Paranoia 10.39

Hostility 6.05

Phobias 5.22

OCD: Obsessive-compulsive disorder

Table 3

The relationship between mobile phone addiction behavior and mental health

Types of addictive behaviors toward mobile phone Correlation coefficient with mental health

Habitual -0.417*

Voluntary -0.011

Dependent -0.317*

Involuntary -0.309*

Mandatory -0.060

Addictive behaviors -0.330*

General addictive behavior toward mobile phones -0.383*

*Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2-tailed)

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Discussion

The results of this study showed that university students of Shahrekord, based on the six categories of mobile phone addictive behaviors, were mostly placed in categories of habitual, voluntary, and dependent behaviors with 20.30%. These finding were consistent with results of several studies.12,17-20 As was noted in the findings section, there was a significant inverse relationship between mobile phone addiction and mental health. Findings show that the highest correlation was related to mental health and habitual behaviors. Habitual behaviors refer to behaviors that are formed from habit, without hesitation, thought, and mental awareness in order to achieve a particular purpose.17 Students who suffer from lower mental health, usually when faced with a challenge, a problem, or an assignment or a specific purpose, feel helpless, frustrated, and powerless. As a result, to counteract these negative feelings, they turn to their previous habits involuntarily and automatically, such as mobile phone contacts, and with this they reduce their anxiety and worry due to their inefficiencies. It was observed that after habitual behaviors, addictions and dependent behaviors have the highest negative correlation with mental disorder. One of the most important causes of this serious relationship probably depends on the nature of addictive and dependent behaviors. Addictive behavior refers to a sudden and involuntary tendency to do a particular act or behavior, in the state of psychological imbalance, and the main factors that drive this conflict and psychological imbalance are irrational negative, inner thoughts.12,21-23 Hence, it seems that students with lower mental health and psychological balance, are more vulnerable to addictive mobile phones use, because they try to reduce their internal tensions by talking to others. On the other hand, students who had average and high mental health levels also had some types of addiction to mobile phones (habitual addiction). This could be related to excessive use of mobile phones for long-distance calls to family members. Another factor is the lack of entertainment and addiction to entertainment and games that are available on mobile phones. Factors such as jealousy, personality characteristics, the presence or absence of metacognitive skills such as self-regulation skills, and financial considerations could be other factors for the usage or non-usage of cell phones.21-23 Further research on the relationship between these factors and mobile phone addiction is recommended.

The results showed that between mental health and addictive behaviors toward mobile phones there was a significant inverse relationship in the categories of dependent, involuntary, and addiction behaviors. In other words, in higher mental health, human behavior is more rational, and the amount of cell phone addiction reduces. These findings were consistent with results from a number of studies such as Thomee et al.,3 Chen,19 Billieux et al.,17 Park et al.,18Hassanzadeh and Rezaei,1 Golmohammadian and Yaseminejad,24 and Seyed Ali.25 Research results indicate that there is a relationship between addiction to mobile phone and mental health in dimensions of behavioral problems, anxiety, depression, and psychosis. In addition, the results showed that there was no relationship between the occurrence of behaviors of cell phone addiction and gender, type of residence, type of university, and the study filed. These findings were consistent with results of Koo and Park,26 Pawlowska and Potembska,27 Wei,28 and Wilska,29 and domestic research, including Zamani et al.21-23 The investigation showed that there was a relationship between mobile phone addictive behavior and gender-related factors. Furthermore, there was a relationship between habitual behaviors of mobile phone use and marital status, addictive behaviors, and university. However, the results indicated that there was no significant relationship between mental health and gender, marital status, type of residence, university, and field of study.

Conclusion

Survey results showed that with increased and improved mental health, the rates of students’ addiction to mobile phones reduced. Hence, it is necessary to take more steps in developing recreational programs for students’ leisure time to maintain students’ mental health, and thereby decrease addiction to a variety of new digital media such as the Internet, chat rooms, computer games, and mobile phones. Therefore, it is necessary that the university authorities and higher education institutions develop training programs, and make efforts to maintain physical and mental health of students.

May 20, 2016 - Does City Life Pose a Risk to Mental Health? - scientific american

Their analysis revealed that growing up in the city nearly doubled the likelihood of psychotic symptoms at age 12, and that exposure to crime along with low social cohesion (that is, a lack of closeness and supportiveness between neighbors) were the biggest risk factors. Although most kids who have psychotic symptoms will not develop schizophrenia as adults, Fisher notes, “In some of the other studies where we follow people later in life, we show that [psychotic symptoms] are actually related to lots of other [mental health] problems as well, so it’s a broader marker for that.” These problems include depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and substance abuse.

“This [study] adds to our own experimental evidence that strongly leads us to suspect that being in the city does something to a specific circuit in the brain that impairs your ability to deal with social stress,” says Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, director of University of Heidelberg’s Central Institute for Mental Health in Germany. Meyer-Lindenberg’s group previously found that people who were living in or grew up in cities showed stronger activation in the amygdala and cingulate cortex (brain areas involved in processing and regulating emotion), respectively, compared with those from rural areas. More recently, they discovered that migration, another well-established risk factor for schizophrenia, led to similar alterations in brain function.

2017 - Gender differences in factors associated with smartphone addiction: a cross-sectional study among medical college students

The final sample included 1441 undergraduate students. Out of the 1441 smartphone users, 696 (48.3%) were male, while 745 (51.7%) were female. They were aged 17– 26 years (mean age, 19.72 ± 1.43 years). The results indicated that smartphone addiction was present in 429 (29.8%) of the 1441 participants, and the prevalence of smartphone addiction was 30.3% in males, and 29.3% in females

2020 - From the Center of Urban Design and Mental Health’s website:

Cities are associated with higher rates of most mental health problems compared to rural areas: an almost 40% higher risk of depression, over 20% more anxiety, and double the risk of schizophrenia, in addition to more loneliness, isolation and stress. (click here for more detail).

Three reasons why people in cities may have increased mental health problems

Pre-existing risk factors: Many people move to the city in search of better services, economic and social opportunities, and distance from past negative experiences. Some of the reasons that some people may seek these things happen to be risk factors for mental health problems: for example, poverty, unemployment, homelessness, physical and mental health problems, previous trauma, personal crises, family break up, addiction, and immigration. This social drift engenders a population who are particularly predisposed to mental disorders.

Social factors: People with pre-existing risk factors, particularly poverty, minority status, or existing mental health problems often encounter negative disparities in the city. For example, this can involve physical and psychological segregation into neighbourhoods that may be characterised by poverty and social challenges, engendering feelings of injustice and hopelessness, and experiences of prejudice and discrimination that may affect mental health. Low social cohesion and crime victimisation have been found to increase the risk of psychosis in childhood.

Environmental factors: The urban setting can affect people in two key ways: increasing stimuli, and stripping away of protective factors.

Overload: People who live in the city experience an increased stimulus level: density, crowding, noise, smells, sights, disarray, pollution and intensity of other inputs. Every part of the urban environment is deliberately designed to assert meanings and messages. These stimuli trigger action and thought on a latent level of awareness, and become more potent as an inability to ‘cope’ sets in. This can have the effect of overload: increasing the body’s baseline levels of arousal, stress, and preparedness, but also driving people to seek relief: quiet, private spaces; over time this urge may evolve into social isolation associated with depression and anxiety, and also forms the basis of the ecological hypothesis of schizophrenia.

Erosion of protective factors: People who live in the city may find that they have less access to the factors that are protective for good mental health than those in rural areas. For example, they may have diminished access to nature, fewer opportunities to integrate exercise as part of their daily routines, and reduced leisure time as increased time is spent at work and commuting around the city. People may find themselves feeling unsafe, having less privacy, and even less sleep, due to factors like crowding, light, noise and stress. Rural to urban migration often sees people leaving behind their strong social networks of friends and family, and it takes time to develop similarly supportive social capital in the city. This may particularly be the case as urban dwellers may be reluctant to engage in social interactions, to avoid overstimulation, due to safety concerns, or because of the reduced likelihood of future relationships with each individual they encounter. As these protective factors erode, people become more vulnerable to developing mental health problems.

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