The average annual growth rate of the Nebraska bowfishing state record bighead carp from 2002 to 2011 was 49% higher than it was from 1991 to 2002

“Society wants to believe it can identify evil people, or bad or harmful people, but it’s not practical. There are no stereotypes.”

― Ted Bundy

June 8, 2020 - Nebraska - Stop the Presses, Big Fish !

June 15, 2020 - Nebraska - Stop the Presses, Big Fish , Second Week in a Row!

June 26, 2020 - Nebraska - Stop the Presses, They Come in Threes!

All three headlines immediately above are written by the same person, a man named Daryl Bauer. All use the false guise of familiarity to omit the type of fish, the name of the state, and the word “state”, all to make the article subjects almost completely unsearchable.

Daryl pretends to be a guy who likes fish, and perhaps he’s grown to, as he’s developed in his role down through the years. But Daryl’s writing makes it easy to identify him as an agent, a confidence man, a bad actor, a flatfoot, a generational Satanist stooge.

He and his peers who write propaganda for a living all use repetitive writing tricks that they call “tradecraft”. And I break down and expose those tricks every day in this ongoing series of articles.

Here’s Agent Bauer’s picture:

[image]

I’ve included it so you could get a better idea of what a generational Satanist in a position of marginal influence looks like.

In the first story, from June 8, 2020, Ed steps right out and underscores the obfuscation he’s practicing, under the stern guise of “officiality”:

“I am not going to say a lot about this because I am going to wait for the paperwork and official details .”

In his article, Agent Bauer “compartmentalized” the subject by omitting almost all information on the previous record, saying only “Our rod & reel state record for flathead catfish has stood for years at 80 pounds.” Where " for years " is general. As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.

I had to look up a separate story to learn that “It tops an 80-pounder taken out of the Loup Power Canal by Willam Swanson on June 14, 1988.”

That story, headlined “Swanton angler demolishes Nebraska state record with 89-pound flathead catfish”, was written by Marjie Ducey Lee, a peer of Ed’s in the “Fish” subsection of the Intelligence team. You might have noticed that she used the lurid but general " demolishes Nebraska state record."

In the body, she walks it back by using " tops an 80-pounder" to describe the margin, which, in direct contradiction to the headline, falsely implies that the new record is just above the old. While, in fact, the current Nebraska state record flathead catfish, from 2020, weighed 89 pounds, and is 11.25% above the previous 80-pound record holder from 1988.

The new record didn’t " top " the old, it " demolished " it. Which is more than curious, in that such records are usually broken by tiny margins, as organisms grow at progressively smaller rates as they approach their maximum possible size. Here, the record stood for over thirty years, and then was suddenly broken by a huge margin.

Here’s Agent Lee’s picture:

[image]

I’ve included it so you could get a better idea of what a generational Satanist in a position of marginal influence looks like.

Ed’s second headline, from June 15, 2020, reads “Stop the Presses, Big Fish , Second Week in a Row!”

Where, under the false guise of familiarity, the headline omits the type of fish, the word “state”, the word “record”, and the name of the state, which makes the subject almost completely unsearchable.

The article continues:

“Got into the office this morning and found documentation for another state record fish . This was another notable catch , a big fish, a big popular sport fish !” Where "another notable catch ", "big fish " and "big popular sports fish " are three consecutive general hedges against the use of the fish’s name, which Ed has deliberately “buried” in the paragraph below it.

Agent Bauer has called the largest fish of its kind ever caught in the state merely " notable ". And the hugest fish of its kind ever caught in the state is repeatedly referred to as merely " big ". It’s more blatant hedging.

Ed continues on:

“For years I have been saying that if our rod & reel record for hybrid striped bass, wiper, was ever going to fall, it was going to come from Lake McConaughy. It did!”

The story he’s writing is about the largest fish of its kind ever caught in Nebraska - a fish which we have finally learned is a hybrid striped bass. Ed has used this " for years " ruse to trick you into thinking " it’s no big deal , and the expert saw it coming."

Say what you will about them, there’s no quit in these guys, and of course gals.

We finally learn “That fish weighed in at 21 pounds 9 ounces, beating the old rod & reel state record by a pound and a half ! It was 36 inches long.”

Keeping to formula, Ed has again omitted any mention of when the previous record was set, and has used the general " by a pound and a half " to soften as best he could the impact of the gigantic margin between the old record and the new. I was forced to do the math to learn that the new Nebraska state record hybrid striped bass, from 2020, weighed 21 pounds 9 ounces, and was 7.4% larger than the previous 20-pound, 1-ounce record holder from 1999.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size. Here the record stood for over twenty years, and then was suddenly broken by a huge margin.

There’s clearly been some great positive change in the environment of the hybrid striped bass in Nebraska.

Ed’s third article, from June 26, 2020, is headlined “Stop the Presses, They Come in Threes!”

Where, under the false guise of familiarity, Ed for a third time omits the type of fish, the word “state”, the word “record”, and the name of the state, which makes the subject almost completely unsearchable.

I said earlier that Ed might have grown to love him some fish, since he was made to write about it for a living. Well, that was an incorrect surmise:

“Now, this fish was not a game fish, and it was not caught on rod and reel. But, it was still a BIG FISH, and I know how folks LOVE big fish!”

He fronts like he does, but Ed doesn’t really love big fish. Any texting addict can see the hateful irony of the block capitals in “I know how folks LOVE big fish.”

He hates that his literally-Death-worshipping tribe’s “great work of ages” has been scuttled by simple Orgonite. And he hates that he has to write these repetitive “hit pieces” about new fish records every week.

Ed goes on:

"Any way you hold that fish, it was big ! Eighty-one pounds, fourteen ounces big to be exact, and 52 inches long.

That fish was a bighead carp . Avid bowfisher Richard Porter arrowed it last Wednesday. He found it on a private sandpit in Dodge County. It was a little more than two and a half pounds bigger than the old bowfishing state record for bighead carp."

Precisely as he did in the first two examples, here Ed has again omitted any mention of when the previous record was set, and has used the general " a little more than two and a half pounds bigger " to soften as best he could the unusually large margin between the old record and the new.

Thanks to Ed’s compartmentalization of the subject, I was forced to look up another article to find out the correct weight, and when the record was set, and who set it.

The current Nebraska bowfishing state record bighead carp, from 2020, weighed 81 pounds, 14 ounces, and was 3.2% larger than the previous 79-pound, 6-ounce record holder from 2011.

That’s an average increase in size .35% over those 9 years.

That record holder from 2011 was 60% larger than the previous record 49-pound, 9-ounce record holder from 2002.

That’s an average increase in size of 6.6% over those 9 years.

That record holder from 2002 was 44% larger than the previous 34-pound, 8-ounce record holder from 1991.

That’s an average increase in size of 4.4% over those 11 years.

The average annual growth rate of the Nebraska bowfishing state record bighead carp from 2002 to 2011 was 49% higher than it was from 1991 to 2002.

The growth rate increased exponentially, going forward in time.

That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible.

There’s clearly been some major positive change in the environment of the bighead carp in Nebraska.

The words " mystery ", " baffled " and " puzzled " are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly controlled and coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything. One of those variants is " crazy ".

That’s why Ed’s piece on the bighead carp reads:

" CrayCray

EDITOR’S NOTE #2: The second bighead, the purdy orange one, ended up weighing in at 78 pounds 8 ounces. That would not have been big enough to beat the old record, nor of course this new one, but it is still crazy that there were two bigheads of that size from the same pit, same day!"

There’s clearly been some major positive change in the environment of the flathead catfish, hybrid striped bass and bighead carp in Nebraska.

That unmentioned positive change in the environment is Etheric.

The strict propaganda regime that Agents Bauer and Lee help to enforce is in place because research of fish records quickly exposes the fact that the primary driver of the size, fertility and longevity of any organism is the health of its Etheric environment.

Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, July 7, 2020

If you’d like to be added to this free mailing list, please send me a note at [email protected]

STRIPED HYBRID - 20 lbs., 1 oz.; Steve

Lytle, McCook; 8/1/1999; Red Willow

Reservoir (Frontier Co.); Golden shiner.

2002 - BIGHEAD CARP49 LBS. – 9 OZ.MARLYN WIEBLEHAUS6/5/2002

2011 - Nebraska Bow Fishing Records Set
Michael Holly set an archery record with a 79-pound, 6-ounce bighead carp, taken in the Missouri River in Cedar County on May 10.

August 13, 2016 - Twenty-five years ago, his bow record was 34 pounds, 8 ounces. Now, the state record is 79-6.

June 5, 2020 - Stop the Presses, Big Fish!

I am not going to say a lot about this because I am going to wait for the paperwork and official details. But, it has been mentioned on social media already. . . .

My phone lit up yesterday afternoon. That is unusual for a Sunday. So, what was up? Well, reports were a potential rod & reel state record flathead catfish had been caught.

Now, understand I have been responsible for our Nebraska fish state records for several years. I have heard lots of stories. Many has been the supposed state record fish that ended up being not nearly big enough, or were something other than what the angler thought they were.

Our rod & reel state record for flathead catfish has stood for years at 80 pounds. It was going to take a darned big flatty to beat that record, and I was going to believe it when I saw it!

A certified scale was located. Pictures were sent.

Looks like our rod & reel state record flathead catfish will now stand at 89 pounds!

StateRecordFlatheadCatRodReelJune2020a

Richard Hagen was the successful angler. Fish was caught from the Missouri River on a bluegill.

It was released alive back into the river!

That is all for now. When I get the official paperwork, you know I will blog more about that and other state record fish later.

Congratulations, Richard!

June 11, 2020 - Swanton angler demolishes Nebraska state record with 89-pound flathead catfish

By Marjie Ducey Lee/BH News Service Jun 11, 2020

He’s still waiting to receive the paperwork, so he can certify it as the official record. It tops an 80-pounder taken out of the Loup Power Canal by Willam Swanson on June 14, 1988.

June 15, 2020 - Stop the Presses, Big Fish, Second Week in a Row!

daryl bauer

Got into the office this morning and found documentation for another state record fish. This was another notable catch , a big fish , a big popular sport fish !

For years I have been saying that if our rod & reel record for hybrid striped bass, wiper, was ever going to fall, it was going to come from Lake McConaughy.

It did!

Tou Kong Yang from Colorado caught this beauty yesterday!

That fish weighed in at 21 pounds 9 ounces, beating the old rod & reel state record by a pound and a half ! It was 36 inches long.

It was caught on a swimbait–a great bait for big predator fish!

Congratulations, Tou!

[image]

June 26, 2020 - Stop the Presses, They Come in Threes!

daryl bauer

I usually have an idea of what I am going to blog about for the next week or two. But, what good would blogging be if you did not post the “hottest”, most recent, breaking information?

Most of you know that we have had a couple of notable state record fish caught in Nebraska the past two weeks. First it was a big flathead catfish, then a big hybrid striped bass. I was joking with my supervisor yesterday that fishing has gone down the tubes this week–no state records. There goes my bonus (also a joke).

Then, after hours last night, my e-mail lit up again. . . .

Now, this fish was not a game fish, and it was not caught on rod and reel. But, it was still a BIG FISH, and I know how folks LOVE big fish! So, how about this:

HOLY COW!

OK, inevitably there will be some doubter grumble about the camera and position of the fish. Just for you, here is another shot:

StateRecordBigheadArcheryJune2020c

Any way you hold that fish, it was big ! Eighty-one pounds, fourteen ounces big to be exact, and 52 inches long.

That fish was a bighead carp. Avid bowfisher Richard Porter arrowed it last Wednesday. He found it on a private sandpit in Dodge County. It was a little more than two and a half pounds bigger than the old bowfishing state record for bighead carp.

Congratulations, Richard!

Wonder what else is swimming out there? Wonder what it will be next week? Better check the state record rules in the Fishing Guide, because you never know. . . .

EDITOR’S NOTE: More to the story. . . .

I often remind folks to check the state records and to be familiar with the rules because you just never know. Well, there is more to this story. I have subsequently picked this up from FaceBook. . . . There happens to have been another bowfishing boat on the same sandpit, same day. They also arrowed a HUGE bighead carp!

CouldaBeenBowFishingRecordBighead

Yes, the coloration of that bighead was unusual, but honestly, we see a lot of bigheads in standing waters, sandpits, that have that unusual golden coloration. We suspect that it may be because those bigheads living in standing waters instead of in a river have a different diet? Maybe the golden fish was in that pit longer?

The reason this relates is that fish was unofficially weighed at 82.5 pounds. Had it been officially certified as a state record, we might have had dueling, bowfishing, state record bighead carp from the same sandpit, same day!!!

CrayCray

EDITOR’S NOTE #2: The second bighead, the purdy orange one, ended up weighing in at 78 pounds 8 ounces. That would not have been big enough to beat the old record, nor of course this new one, but it is still crazy that there were two bigheads of that size from the same pit, same day!

Orgones footer logo
About - Guidelines - FAQ - Privacy - Terms