The current longevity record Golden Warbler, from 2015, was 37% older than the previous record holder from 1999 or prior. The current longevity record arachnid, from 2018, was 53% older than the previous record holder

Watson: “You may be right.”

Holmes: "The probability lies in that direction.”

From " The Hound of the Baskervilles ", by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, 1902

It’s January 2020, and great, epochal positive changes are underway at every level of our reality. They began in earnest in 2012 and have been increasing in speed and magnitude since.

I’ve subjectively concluded that those changes are being driven by untold thousands of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices based on Wilhelm Reich’s work. Those devices are collectively unknitting and transforming the ancient Death energy matrix that’s been patiently built and expanded by our about-to-be-former Dark masters, well, all the way back to Babylon and before. And the Ether is returning to its ages-long natural state of health and vitality.

One of those changes is that Nature is booming and burgeoning to a level not seen in my lifetime.

Since that statement directly refutes our State Religion, which holds that " Poor Mother Gaia is Dying, Crushed by the Virus-Like Burden of Mankind" , I’ve appended numerous recent examples below to support it.

An article that I’ve appended below, from 2015, is headlined "Golden-cheeked Warbler: New Maximum Longevity Record. "

In it, we read “Our observations extend the known maximum longevity of male Golden-cheeked Warblers beyond earlier reports.”

Ah, the beauty of pure mil-speak! The author uses the hedging generality " beyond earlier reports" to cover up a specific and much more impactful statistic. So I had to do the math.

The current longevity record Golden Warbler, from 2015, was 11 years old, 37% older than the previous record holder from 1999 or prior, which was 8 years old.

Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, as the organism gets closer and closer to its maximum possible age. Here’s it has been broken by a huge margin, after standing for decades.

The words “mystery”, “baffled” and “puzzled” are memes, used, among numerous similar variants, whenever anyone in the wholly-controlled-and-coopted Political, Academic, Scientific and Media establishments wants to lie about, well, basically anything.

That’s why this article reads “Despite the Golden-cheeked Warbler’s endangered status and long-term efforts at banding and monitoring at other locations, little information exists regarding the species’ maximum longevity.”

Another article that I’ve appended below, from 2018, is headlined “The world’s oldest known spider has died after a record-breaking lifespan of 43 years, according to researchers in Australia.”

In it, we learn that “The long-lived arachnid far outlasted the previous record holder, a 28-year-old tarantula in Mexico , according to a study published in January in the journal Pacific Conservation Biology.”

The author uses the hedging generality " far outlasted" to cover up a specific and much more impactful statistic, and then omits any further mention of when the previous record was set. So I had to do the math.

The current longevity record arachnid, from 2018, a tarantula, was 43, 53% older than the previous record holder. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, as the organism gets closer and closer to its maximum possible age. Here’s it’s been broken by a huge margin. The author hedges violently by using the terse "record breaking " to describe the shattered record.

You will note two additional stories below from 2019, “(PDF) New longevity record for the Mediterranean horseshoe crab”, and “New Longevity Record for Ivory Gulls.”

In both cases, I tried to download the free pdf of the story, but was blocked from doing so when I could not enter a scientific employer. Only club-member generational Satanists may apply, you see.

The same serial obfuscation is being used in longevity records as it is in fish records.

We may find, nay, I may already have already just proven that the great ages of the Patriarch’s of the Bible were not “exaggerations”, but rather an accurate record of how long people lived prior to the deliberate degeneration of the Earth’s energetic or Etheric environment, to the point where life became “nasty, brutish and short”, as the barely-closeted Death worshippers who rule us have always wished.

Looks to me like the game is slipping, has slipped from their grasp!

Please consider sending them highest love energy as you read this.

And, if you haven’t already done so, please consider distributing simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices where you live and work today.

Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, January 15, 2020

If you’d like to be added to the mailing list, please send me a note at [email protected]

2004 - A new longevity record for the Pacific Golden-Plover

We monitored a marked Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva) over many seasons on a wintering ground in Hawaii. The bird died at a minimum age of 21 yr 3 mo, thus demonstrating the potential for a long lifespan in some individuals and setting a new longevity record for the species.

(clicked the link to access the article, link dead, - ed)

January 1, 2013 - A New Record For Human Male Longevity

One of the expected signs of an upward trend in longevity is the setting of new records in maximum human life span, and an increase in the number of people getting closer to that record. The longest documented human life, that of Jeanne Calment, was an unusual statistical outlier, however, so despite progress that record will stand for a while at the current rate of increase in elder life expectancy. On the male side of the house there is no such unusually long-lived individual in the verified records, and the age of the oldest male supercentenarians is indeed inching upward:

[On December 28th] Jiroemon Kiruma has set a world record. At 115 years 253 days he has become the oldest living man in history. The record was previously held by Christian Mortensen who lived to 115 years 252 days.

Among supercentenarians being a male is particularly rare. The oldest living person in history was a woman named Jeanne Calment who lived to be 122. Currently there are 64 supercentenarians in the world (those 110 years and old) and only 4 of them are males. Kiruma is also the oldest living person in the world, a record he achieved when Dina Mafredini of Iowa passed away ten days ago.

Kiruma has a strong will to live per family members, though presently he is in a hospital suffering from an illness of 10 days duration. His condition is noted to be improving. “His condition has improved, and we’re not worried, but the doctors said it would be best if he stayed in the hospital into the new year,” said Yasuhiro Kawato a hospital spokesperson.

Kimura lives with his grandson’s widow Eiko Kimura, and continues to eat three small meals per day, a strategy he has maintained for life. He is conversant and generally cheerful though now spends most of his time in bed. He has also escaped disease.

2015 - GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER: NEW MAXIMUM LONGEVITY RECORD

The Golden-cheeked Warbler (Setophaga chrysoparia) breeds exclusively in juniper–oak woodlands in central Texas (Ladd and Gass 1999). It was listed as endangered in 1990 because of habitat loss and fragmentation (Smith 1990). Much of the research on the Golden-cheeked Warbler’s demography has been part of long-term monitoring at Fort Hood Military Reservation and at Balcones Canyonlands Preserve (see Groce et al. 2010).

The species has been banded and monitored at other locations as well, including Kerr Wildlife Management Area (WMA), Kerr County.

On 19 April 2013, we observed an adult male Golden-cheeked Warbler at Kerr WMA with a single aluminum U.S. Geological Survey band on his left leg. On 14 May 2013, we captured the banded male by placing a mist net near him while he was singing and playing a recording of the species’ song to lure him into the net.

With the bird in hand, we recorded the number on his band (2410-77143) and added three auxiliary color bands so that he could be identified later by sight. We continued to monitor the male over the 2013 breeding season (March to July). In 2014, five different observers independently identified the male on 12 separate occasions and accurately recorded his unique combination of color bands. He successfully paired and fledged young in both years.

On 9 May 2015, Colón and Holden observed the male again and independently recorded the correct color band combination. The male

was foraging quietly in the company of a female, an unbanded male, and fledglings. The bird was originally banded at Kerr WMA on 19 April 2006 (D. A. Cimprich pers. comm.). We first located him in 2013 in the southern portion of Kerr WMA and found him in the same small patch of vegetation again in 2014 and 2015, supporting previous observations that the site fidelity of male Golden-cheeked Warblers to their breeding grounds is high (Pulich 1976, Peak and Thomas 2010). On the basis of his plumage, the male was at least two years old when banded in 2006. We last observed him on 9 May 2015, inferring a minimum age of 11 years.

Despite the Golden-cheeked Warbler’s endangered status and long-term efforts at banding and monitoring at other locations, little information exists regarding the species’ maximum longevity (see Groce et al. 2010). The oldest male and female Golden-cheeked

Warblers previously reported were 8 and 6 years old, respectively (Ladd and Gass 1999, R. G. Peak, unpubl. data).

Our observations extend the known maximum longevity of male Golden-cheeked Warblers beyond earlier reports. Our observations also place the Golden-cheeked Warbler among the few Setophaga warblers known to be capable of living to over 10 years. To our knowledge, longevity of ≥10 years has been reported for only six other species of Setophaga: Adelaide’s (S. adelaidae), Prairie (S. discolor), Townsend’s (S. townsendi), Yellow (S. petechia), and Yellow-rumped Warblers (S. coronata auduboni) and the American Redstart (S. ruticilla) (Kennard 1975, Klimkiewicz et al. 1983, Lutmerding and Love 2014).

April 30, 2018 - The World’s Oldest Known Spider Has Died at the Age of 43 From a Wasp Sting

(The headline shakes the doll of the wasp-sting death, to cover up “shatters the record” -ed)

The world’s oldest known spider has died after a record- breaking lifespan of 43 years, according to researchers in Australia.

The spider, known as Number 16 to Australian scientists, was a female trapdoor tarantula living in Western Australia’s Central Wheatbelt region, Agence France-Press reports. The spider didn’t die of old age, however, but was killed by a wasp sting, researchers said Monday.

The long-lived arachnid far outlasted the previous record holder, a 28-year-old tarantula in Mexico, according to a study published in January in the journal Pacific Conservation Biology. Number 16 was discovered during a spider population study in 1974, and has been monitored by researchers since then.

January 22, 2019 - New longevity record for the Mediterranean horseshoe crab

October 28, 2019 - New Longevity Record for Ivory Gulls (Pagophila eburnea)

Ivory gulls (Pagophila eburnea) have been listed as “endangered” in Canada and “near threatened” interna-tionally. In June 2010, we visited Seymour Island, Nunavut, Canada, where gulls were banded in the 1970s and 1980s. We recaptured and released two breeding gulls banded as chicks in 1983, confirming natal philopatry to this breeding colony. These gulls are more than 28 years old, making the ivory gull one of the longest-living marine bird species known in North America.

(The data is buried in the article, which the firewall keeps me from getting to, because I don’t work for a science company. - ed)

December 29, 2019 - World’s oldest rhino Fausta dies in Tanzania aged 57

(Can you see how they put it into quotes, to call it in to question? - ed)

Conservationists in Ngorongoro said Fausta, pictured, was the oldest rhino in the world

A rhino thought to be the oldest in the world has died in Tanzania, aged 57.

(Takes the fact and hedges it back downward to a question. That’s called ’ spin ’ - ed)

Fausta, an eastern black rhino, was first sighted in the Ngorongoro crater in 1965, when she was three.

She roamed the crater freely for more than 54 years, but health issues in her old age required her to spend her final few years receiving specialist care in a sanctuary.

Fausta never had calves - something conservationists in Ngorongoro suggest may have contributed to her long life.

By 2016, Fausta’s eyesight was deteriorating and she was suffering from the lingering effects of hyena attacks.

“Vicious animals, especially hyenas, started attacking her and she received very serious sores,” Dr Freddy Manongi, from the Ngorongoro Conservation Authority, told BBC Swahili. “By 2016, we had to get her out of the wild and put her in special care.”

He added that on the day Fausta died, another rhino was born.

Mr Manongi later said in a statement that “records show that Fausta lived longest [of] any rhino in the world”, and that she had died of natural causes on the evening of 27 December.

(The story makes no mention of the previous record. - ed)

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