The increase in size of the state record quillback carpsucker in Michigan from 2014 to 2015 was twice that seen from 2012 to 2014. And its increase in size from June to July of 2015 was three times that seen from 2014 to 2015

“Madness is something rare in individuals — but in groups, parties, peoples, and ages, it is the rule.”

― From " Beyond Good and Evil ", by Friedrich Nietzsche, 1886

(Owen Seay of Big Rapids caught a record-breaking quillback carpsucker while baitcasting in the Muskegon River in Mecosta County on April 28.)

It’s July 2020, and great positive changes are underway at every level of our reality. They began in earnest in 2012, and have been increasing in speed and magnitude. I began writing this series of articles, entitled “Positive Changes That Are Occurring”, in July of 2013.

These historically-unprecedented positive changes are being driven by many hundreds of thousands, if not millions of simple, inexpensive Orgonite devices based on Wilhelm Reich’s work.

Since Don Croft first fabricated tactical Orgonite in 2000, its widespread, ongoing and ever-increasing distribution has been unknitting and transforming the ancient Death energy matrix built and expanded by our dark masters, well, all the way back to Babylon, and before. And, as a result, the Ether is returning to its natural state of health and vitality.
For example, the current Michigan state record quillback carpsucker fish, from April 2020, weighed 9 pounds 15 ounces, and was 22.3% larger than a prior 8.12-pound record holder from June 2012.

Since research into the records so clearly shows the great positive change that’s occurred, the record prior to 2012 has been scrubbed from the web.

A current news story below documenting the 2020 record is headlined " Fish caught in Mecosta County, Monroe County set new Michigan records".

Where, under the false guise of “journalistic efficiency”, the author has lumped two fish-record accounts into one, to make the subject drastically less searchable.

The author says that “Owen Seay of Big Rapids caught a record-breaking quillback carpsucker while baitcasting in the Muskegon River in Mecosta County on April 28. The catch weighing in at 9 pounds, 15 ounces measured 24.75 inches. It broke the previous state record, a 8.52-pound catch on Hardy Dam Pond in Newaygo County in 2015.”

Where " broke " is a hedging generality, put forward to mask a far more impactful percentage. So I was forced to do the math. The new record holder was 4.6% larger than the old. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size. Here the record stood for years, and then was suddenly broken by a large margin.

A story from July 2015 about the previous record is headlined “Big fish: State -record quillback carpsucker caught”.

Where, under the false guise of familiarity, the author has omitted the name of the state, to make the subject virtually unsearchable.

Now we’ll review the records in order.

The record holder from October 28, 2014 weighed 8.25 pounds, and was 1.6% larger than that previous record holder from 2012.

That’s an example of a record being broken by a small margin, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The next record holder, from June 20, 2015, weighed 8.52 pounds, and was 3.2% larger than the previous record holder from 2014.

The increase in size of the state record quillback carpsucker in Michigan from 2014 to 2015 was twice that seen from 2012 to 2014.

The growth rate is increasing exponentially, going forward in time. That’s not supposed to be scientifically possible, as organisms grow in progressively smaller increments as they approach their maximum possible size.

The next record holder, from July 16, 2015, weighed 9.42 pounds, and was 10.5% larger than the previous record holder from June. Such records are usually broken by tiny margins. Here, the record stood only briefly and was broken by a stupendous margin.

The increase in size of the quillback carpsucker in Michigan from June to July of 2015 was three times that seen from 2014 to 2015.

The next (and current) record holder, from April 28, 2020, weighed 9 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 4.6% larger than the previous record holder from July 2015.

The increase in size of the state record quillback carpsucker in Michigan from 2014 to 2015 was twice that seen from 2012 to 2014. And its increase in size from June to July of 2015 was three times that seen from 2014 to 2015.

There’s clearly been some exponential improvement in the environment of the quillhead carpsucker in Michigan.

That unmentioned positive change is Etheric, energetic.

There’s an international news blackout in place on the subject. Because you’re not supposed to know that the primary driver of the size, fertility and longevity of any organism is the health of its Etheric environment.

Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, July 17, 2020

If you’d like to be added to this free mailing list, please send me a note at [email protected]

October 28, 2014 - The Michigan DNR has confirmed that Benjamin Frey’s 8.25-pound quillback carpsucker is a new state record—one of five new records set in the state this year. The Grand Rapids bowfisherman (pictured second from left) landed the 22.6-inch quillback on Hardy Dam Pond on August 29.

July 15, 2015 - Coincidentally, Hardy Dam Pond was also where the last two quillback records were nabbed, earning the pond a reputation as one of the best places to fish for the species in Michigan. The previous record holder was Grand Rapids bowfisherman Benjamin Frey, who arrowed a fish measuring 8.25 pounds and 22.62 inches in 2014. Before him, the record belonged to Randy Bonter, Jr. of Grant, who caught a 8.12-pound, 23-inch quillback in 2012.

July 30, 2015 - Big fish: State-record quillback carpsucker caught

This marks the fifth state-record fish caught in 2015 – although two of those records have been for quillback carpsucker, in the same body of water.

The state record was broken by a fish caught by Blake Wilson of Lake Ann, on Hardy Dam Pond in Newaygo County on July 16. Wilson was bowfishing at 11:42 p.m.

The fish weighed 9.42 pounds and measured 25 inches. The previous state-record quillback carpsucker was caught by Garrett Reid of Nashville, Mich., also on Hardy Dam Pond, on June 20. That fish weighed 8.52 pounds and measured 24 inches.

July 14, 2020 - Fish caught in Mecosta County, Monroe County set new Michigan records

Fish caught in Mecosta County, Monroe County set new Michigan records

Owen Seay of Big Rapids caught a record-breaking quillback carpsucker while baitcasting in the Muskegon River in Mecosta County on April 28.

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By Brandon Champion | [email protected]

Two fish caught during the coronavirus pandemic have broken Michigan records.

The fish, caught in Mecosta County and Monroe County, respectively, have both been verified as state records by DNR personnel.

“During the first few months of the coronavirus emergency in Michigan, a lot of people turned to the outdoors for exercise, fresh air and a little peace of mind,” a DNR news release reads. “For two residents, that included time on the water that led to new state-record fish.”

Owen Seay of Big Rapids caught a record-breaking quillback carpsucker while baitcasting in the Muskegon River in Mecosta County on April 28. The catch weighing in at 9 pounds, 15 ounces measured 24.75 inches. It broke the previous state record, a 8.52-pound catch on Hardy Dam Pond in Newaygo County in 2015.

Scott Heintzelman, the DNR’s Central Lake Michigan Management Unit manager out of Cadillac, verified that new record.

The second record came on May 25 when Garrett Rice of Athens caught a 33-pound bigmouth buffalo measuring more than 3 feet long while bowfishing on Lake Erie in Monroe County.

Jay Wesley, Lake Michigan Basin coordinator with the DNR Fisheries Division, verified Rice’s fish, which replaced the 32-pound record-holder caught last year on the Shiawassee River in Saginaw County.

Verification of state records usually happens quickly after a catch but was delayed due to COVID-19 public health and safety restrictions. These two records were recorded remotely on certified scales, then frozen, and later verified in person.

State-record fish are recognized by weight only. To qualify, a fish must exceed the current listed state-record weight, and identification must be verified by a DNR fisheries biologist.

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