Tuna

TUNA


Papua New Guinea's tuna exports more than tripled from 2013 to 2019. In other words, tuna production in New Guinea increased over 300% in just six years.


The first Tuna sold at the Tokyo fish auction in 2015 sold for $37,000. That’s because prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both.


In March 2015, fishmongers in Adelaide, Australia saw a drop in price for Atlantic salmon, kingfish, king salmon, blue fin and yellow fin tuna.


That’s because prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both. 


Tuna was selling for $2.99 a pound in San Diego in July of 2015.


That’s because prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both. 


The Solomon Islands recorded a $57.5m trade surplus in the 1st Quarter of 2017, “the increase mainly attributed to $52.1m of fish loin exports to Italy.”


I had to research a separate article to learn that more than 90% of the Solomon Islands marine product exports have usually comprised tuna and tuna-related products. Which is how I discovered that the author substituted the general “fish loins” to obscure the great increase in the tuna population. 


As you may recall, generality is a hallmark of propaganda.


In 2018, skipjack tuna priced dropped to a two-year low in Bangkok.


That’s because prices drop either when supply increases, or demand decreases, or both.


An article from August 2018 said that there were “far more” tuna at fishing tournament in Maine, and that the tournament’s quota increase “reflects a tuna resurgence seen on the water for some time.”


The volume of bigeye tuna production in the Philippines increased 89% from 2005 to 2018. The number of tuna in the Philippines closing in on doubling in just over ten years.


The Yellowfin tuna fish catch in Oman increased 47% from 2017 to 2018. There were half again as many tuna in Oman, in just one year.


In November 2017, NPR asked “Is It Time To Catch The Wave Of Rebounding Atlantic Bluefin Tuna?


Fishermen up and down the New England Coast” said it had been “decades” since they’d been able to catch “so many” Atlantic bluefin tuna “so fast”. The author said that, once severely depleted, populations of the prized sushi fish “appear to be rebounding”.


Walter Golet, a jointly appointed researcher at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and University of Maine, said that the increase had been “incredible, just incredible”.


Clay Porch, a federal scientist who leads bluefin stock assessments for the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, or ICCAT, said “It's really difficult to say clearly what environmental changes could have led to this current increase in abundance”.


In December 2017, the U.K.’s Independent said “Huge blue fin tuna weighing 350 pounds caught off Devon coast”. The author said “With ‘more’ bluefin tuna being spotted in British waters ‘due to climate change heating the ocean and changing the path of currents’, researchers expect more to be ‘accidentally’ caught in the future.”


With the truth of the matter being that the North Atlantic was as cold as it had been in 50 years in 2017, as documented in a headline from January 2017 reading “North Atlantic Cooling Has Plunged Below 1950s (And 1800s) Levels”.


If you recall, in the previous example, the federal scientist leading Atlantic Bluefin tuna stock assessments said that it was “really difficult to say clearly” what led to the increase in bluefin tuna abundance in the Atlantic. Why do scientists in the U.K. have clarity that it is “climate change heating the ocean and changing the path of currents”, leading to the “accidental” catch of far more tuna? Why are the Feds in the U.S. without a clue to the cause?


It’s because all of them are lying as hard and fast as they can about the tuna.

 

The pending Washington state record bluefin tuna, caught in August 2019, is 152% percent larger of a prior record holder, caught in 2012. The species well more than doubling in size in seven years.




Jeff Miller, Brooklyn, New York, July 27, 2020




If you'd like to be added to this free mailing list, please send me a note at [email protected]


Orgones footer logo
About - Guidelines - FAQ - Privacy - Terms